Reports of serious adverse effects prompted EU to investigate HPV vaccine

As the number of girls suffering horrible health effects after receiving the Gardasil shot for HPV (human papilloma virus) continues to increase, skepticism about the safety of this new vaccine continues to grow, as well. In fact, the European Medicines Agency (EMA) announced their decision to launch an investigation on the controversial vaccine back in 2015.

A documentary that aired in Denmark — which exposed the potential dangers of Gardasil and showcased the wave of detrimental health effects following the vaccine — is what prompted European officials to study the vaccine further. At least 100 Danish girls have filed for compensation with the government for vaccine injuries, and at least 800 more women in Denmark alone have experienced deleterious effects but haven’t yet filed for compensation.

In spite of this quite large number of affected women, which is likely to continue to grow, in February 2016, the Danish Medicines Agency released a statement explaining their decision not to change the safety profile of Gardasil. The agency states, “The conclusion is that the benefit/risk balance of the vaccine remains unchanged and consequently no changes to the product information of the vaccine are recommended.”

The Danish Medicine Agency also states, “In November, the EMA completed an extraordinary safety assessment upon a request from Denmark and found no evidence supporting a causal link between HPV vaccination and the two syndromes, CRPS and POTS.”

While this may sound like all is well and good, Vactruth reported that in 2013, in the then-latest statistics from the United States Vaccine Adverse Event Reporting System (VAERS), that at least 140 deaths were attributable to the Gardasil vaccine. And that is just how many people died, never mind how many people experienced other types of harm from being vaccinated. According to VAERS statistics, there have been around 30,000 adverse events in response to the Gardasil vaccine. But don’t worry, the EMA says it’s totally fine. Of course, by narrowing their focus to a select few conditions, they easily avoided having to include most of the people who have been harmed by the HPV vaccine. 

Though no changes are being recommended for the product, the agency does state that for 2016, it would be utilizing Ceravix — an equally controversial vaccine for HPV — for its “childhood vaccination program.” However, Ceravix is really no better for anyone. According to The Truth About Gardasil, upwards of 9,000 women have reported serious, adverse reactions to the Ceravix vaccine alone, and it has been attributed to at least three deaths. Does that sound like something you want to put into your child?

 

Sources: 

NaturalNews.com

LaegeMiddelStyrelsen.dk

TruthAboutGardasil.org

Vactruth.com